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By , June 30, 2014

Fall Gardening is Beginning!

Our stores are open for Labour Day – Monday September 1st from 9 am to 5 pm

Nobody wants to admit it but fall is quickly approaching and it is time to start thinking about fall gardening. But don’t despair there are a lot of great plants that you can plant and grow in the fall. You can replace your summer annuals with things like Fall Garden Mums or if you are ready you can plant Winter Pansies. The fall months are when you want to plant you spring flowering bulbs like Crocus, Daffodils, Hyacinths, and Tulips. There are also the fall flowering Crocus that you can plant now to enjoy their blooms right away. Of course there are still many great Perennials that are in bloom and will continue to bloom through the fall like Echinacea, Rubeckia, and Sedum. If you are growing herbs and vegetables there is still time for a crop of Carrots, Radishes, Spinach, Lettuce, and more.

If you are looking for great deals on plants check out our specials page by clicking here.

News & Events

Fall Garden Mums

August 25th, 2014

Add Fall Colour to Your Garden with Mums!

Mums are a great addition to your garden for fall. They provide colour from August to October. They are a great combination plant with Pansies, Kale, or other fall perennials. They are excellent in the garden or in pots and containers. Mums are sold as annuals but they can be left in the garden to flower again next year, just cut them back in the winter and they come up again next spring.

Sedum

August 18th, 2014

Beat the Heat with Sedum!

The Sedum family has over 400 hundred varieties to choose from. These beautiful succulent plants are best in a hot dry sunny location. Which is why they are well suited for the hot dry weather in August and September here in the Pacific Northwest. There are creeping varieties of Sedum like ‘Cape Blanco’ or upright varieties like ‘Autumn Joy’. You can plant beautiful golden leaved varieties like ‘Angelina’ or dark leaved varieties like ‘Matrona’. A new variety for this year is the ‘Class Act’ with beautiful dark pink/red flowers. Try one of these varieties in your garden for their beauty and/or their drought tolerance.

Echibeckia

August 1st, 2014

Try the Newest Perennial – Echibeckia

If you are looking for something new for your garden try the new Echibeckia. It is a cross between two classic perennials Echinacea and Rudbeckia. Like its parents Echibeckia is a great summer flowering perennial that produces beautiful orange or yellow blooms. Echibeckias have the appearance and fast growth of Rudbeckia with the hardiness and disease tolerance of Echinacea. The “Summerina” flowers are huge at 3 inches in diameter and they can last 2-3 months. They start slowering mid summer and will bloom into the fall providing colour for months. Echibeckia is drought tolerant and a heat lover as well.

There are two great varieties for you to try Echibeckia ‘Summerina Orange’ and ‘Summerina Yellow’

Rudbeckia

August 1st, 2014

Add a golden touch to your garden with Rudbeckia!

If there is one perennial that is most commonly associated with late summer and early fall is has to be Rudbeckia. Rudbeckia are among one of the best perennials available for a fall garden. The most popular variety is the ‘Goldsturm’. Goldsturm is a variety of one of our native North American wildflowers. The ‘Goldsturm’ variety was the Perennial Plant of the Year in 1999. However there is a new addition to the Rudbeckia family that is giving Goldsturm a run for its money. The new variety is called ‘Little Gold Star’. Little Gold Star is a more compact dwarf variety. It still has the beautiful fall colour but in a more compact form. If you have limited space consider the ‘Little Gold Star for your garden.

In addition to their brilliant fall colour Rudbeckia seed heads have good winter interest. They make a terrific choice for mass planting, combining especially well with ornamental grasses. They are excellent as a cut flower in bouquets. By removing faded flowers when the flower petals start to fall lengthens the blooming time. Rudbeckia plants can be easily divided in early spring as they start to emerge from the ground. The flowers are attractive to butterflies and make a great centerpiece to any garden bed.

Digiplexis

July 15th, 2014

Try the New Digiplexis ‘llumination Flame’

This striking new hybrid is the result of breeding by Thompson and Morgan between Digitalis (Foxglove) and a Digitalis relative from the canary islands, called Isoplexis. Commonly known as Digiplexis, this ground-breaking new hybrid is big, vigorous, long-blooming, and beautifully colored. Due to their natural hybrid vigor and the fact that these plants are sterile (and do not waste energy trying to go to seed), Digiplexis are bushy, fast-growing, and very floriferous.

Quickly growing to its full size of 36 inches high and 18 inches wide, this Digiplexis grows orderly, densely-packed rows of flame-colored blossoms on upright, strong stems over a long period of bloom. Flowering begins in mid spring and continues through until the end of the summer. The flower stems boast tubular flowers that look like living flames. The outer petals are a fuchsia hue, while the the throats transition from red to orange to a pale yellow. And despite the fact that they are sterile, these gorgeous flowers still attract bees and butterflies, adding even more color to the display.

Plant ‘Illumination Flame’ in full sun to part shade in moist, well-drained soil and give it average water. With little attention, this healthy hybrid thrives in a wide variety of conditions. Its only weakness is the cold–due to its Canary Island parentage, ‘Illumination Flame’ can not take too much chilly weather. Hardy in zones 8 to 11, this Foxglove hybrid is so gorgeous and long-blooming that it is also worth growing as an annual farther north. The cutflowers alone make this one a must-grow!Note: Digiplexis is closely related to Digitalis and contains the same toxins as that Genus. This plant is a skin irritant and can be harmful or fatal if ingested, so be sure to keep children and pets away from your Digiplexis and any water that the flowers have been in.

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