Spring Seminars

By , February 16, 2015

February 16th, 2015

Spring is Coming! Are you Ready?

Are you interested in learning more about gardening?Pruning

Our store hosts a series of gardening classes and seminars throughout the spring. We have just posted the schedule for February and March. Our first seminar is this Saturday February 21st at 10:30 am and it is about how to prune your fruit trees and fruiting bushes.

For more information about this and other seminars click here.

Please note: all seminars and classes are held at our Surrey store.

Valentine’s Day Flowers

By , February 6, 2015

February 6th, 2015

Give Flowers to the one you Love!

Valentine’s Day is Saturday February 14th and Roses make the perfect gift for Valentine’s Day. Order a dozen, half dozen, or single rose. One of our florists can arrange them in a vase, or wrap them as a bouquet.

If you are looking for more than just roses our Surrey Store has several talented florists that can create custom bouquets or arrangements for you or your sweetheart. Call and speak to one of our florists or stop by anytime to place your order.

You can order your flowers online at www.davidhunterflowershop.com or Call 604-590-2431 or stop by today. We have a florist available seven days a week  from 9 AM until 5 PM.

Note: On Friday February 13th and Saturday February 14th our Flower Shop at our Surrey store will be open from 9 am until 6 pm.

Tuberous Begonias

February 6th, 2015

It is time to Start Your Tuberous Begonias!

Begonias come in two different types; tuberous or fibrous. Tuberous begonias are started from an established root called a tuber. Fibrous begonias are started from seed. Tuberous begonias are started indoors in February and March. You should start the tubers in sterile Potting Soil or Starter Mix rich in peat moss in pots or trays.

You can choose from a wide selection of Belgian hybrid tubers as well as many specialty and novelty varieties.

For more information about how to grow tuberous begonias download our information sheet here.


Spring Lawn Care

Spring is a great time to start caring for your lawn!

A well established healthy lawn requires less water, care, and maintenance during the summer.  The following is a list of a few things that you can do now to help ensure that you lawn is healthy and strong all year:

Starting a New Lawn

If you are starting a new lawn it is recommended that you wait until the risk of frost has passed. This is usually in Mid March. It is also important to ensure that there is at least six inches of soil for the lawn to grow its roots. So be sure to till the soil to an even depth to allow for the roots of the grass to develop. Next ensure that the area is level to reduce the possibility of drainage issues in the future. Then you can apply the grass seed or sod to the area and water thoroughly.

If you have an existing lawn you can top dress the lawn by spreading a thin layer (1/4 inch) of top soil and then apply the grass seed on top. Water thoroughly to ensure that the seed germinates.

Watering your Lawn

Adequate watering ensures that your lawn has an established root system to cope with the dry summer months. Be sure to water thoroughly and deeply. Watering restrictions come into affect on June 1st and are in effect until September 30th. Please not that they have changed as of 2013. They are as follows:

Residential Addresses:

  • Even-numbered address: Monday, Wednesdays, and Saturdays 4 am to 9 am
  • Odd-numbered address: Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Sundays 4 am to 9 am
  • Please note: You can no longer water your lawn during the evenings

Non-Residential Addresses:

  • Even numbered addresses: Monday and Wednesday 1 am to 6 am
  • Odd numbered addresses: Tuesday and Thursday 1 am to 6 am
  • All addresses: Friday 4 am to 9 am

Newly planted lawns need special attention. It is best to keep the soil moist for at least 4 to 6 weeks to ensure that your lawn develops an adequate root system. If you are starting a new lawn in the summer be sure to apply for a permit to water outside of the watering restrictions.

Mowing your Lawn

Lawns should be mowed at regular intervals with a sharp mower at the correct height. Lawns should be cut every 7 to 10 days. A rotary mower should to be set at 2 to 3 inches for the season. You lawn mower should be kept sharp at all times. A dull mower tears the grass instead of cutting it, making it more susceptible to diseases. You should use a catcher, or rake the cut grass to remove the cuttings and prevent the build-up of dead grass. If you do not remove the dead grass you should power rake you lawn on a regular basis to remove the layer of dead grass (thatch) that builds up, this is called de-thatching.

Applying Moss Control

Before your moss goes dormant in the summer heat you should take steps to kill and remove the moss in your lawn. To do this apply either a liquid or granular Moss Control to affected areas. Approximately two days later, use a mechanical power rake to remove the dead black moss. The area should then receive a thin layer of soil or sand followed by an application of grass seed to grow where the moss was.

Moss Out

Moss Out

Fertilizing your Lawn

The beauty of your lawn, its resistance to disease, insects, moss and weeds depends largely on how you feed it. With our heavy rains in the coastal area, much of the mineral content (food or fertilizer) of the soil is washed away each year. Every fertilizer shows the percentage of Nitrogen, Phosphorus, and Potash (N.P.K.) For example 12-4-8 is 12% Nitrogen, 4% Phosphorous and 8% Potash.

  • Nitrogen                     – gives the green to lawns and is the main food a lawn responds to
  • Phosphorous            – encourages good root growth
  • Potash                       – promotes strong healthy stems

Lawns should be fed at regular intervals.  We recommend an application of 28-3-8 in early spring. This will feed your lawn for 10 to 12 weeks. For late spring and summer, we recommend 12-4-8. This feeds your lawn for 6 to 8 weeks. Fertilizing should be done when the grass is dry and should then be watered in thoroughly. To ensure an even application, it is best to use a fertilizer spreader.

When you apply fertilizer you should water your lawn to make sure that the fertilizer make it to the soil and does not remain on the leaves where it could burn them.

Applying Lime to Your Lawn

Lime is an important soil conditioner that helps you lawn absorb fertilizer and deter moss from growing. Lime does not kill moss, but does neutralize the pH of the soil making fertilizer applications more effective. To be effective Dolomite Lime should be applied in spring and again in fall.

Top Dressing Your Lawn

After power raking and/or aerating in the spring, your lawn may appear sparse. Top-dressing is a reliable way of rejuvenating it. You can top-dress your lawn with Peat Moss for sandy soils, peat and sand for clay soils, sand if you have wet soil, or top soil. Top-dressing is best done in March or April. After top-dressing you can also apply a thin layer of lawn seed to help fill in the spaces left by the power rake.

Helleborus

By , January 12, 2015

January 12th, 2015

Heavenly Helleborus!

Helleborus, or Christmas Rose, are an easy to grow perennial that bloom continuously for many months. Some varieties start in early December and can bloom until March. They grow best in a dry shady location. They are fairly disease resistant, drought tolerant, and deer resistant. For more information about growing Helleborus click here.

Winter Pansies

January 12th, 2015

Winter Pansies are Ready to Plant!

Winter Pansies are a great way to add colour to your garden from October to April. Pansies come in a variety of colours including shades of yellow, purple, lavender, mauve, orange, and black (dark purple). They will grow in a sunny location or a partially shady spot.

Primula

January 12th, 2015

Add colour to your winter garden with Primula!

If you are looking to add a little colour to your winter garden a fresh delivery of Primula have arrived. Also known as Primrose these hardy plants are great for adding colour to your pots, containers, and gardens. With a range of colours from Pink, Purple, Red, Yellow and White you can be sure to find the right colour for your garden. They make a great planting over your spring bulbs as they will not get in the way when your crocus, tulips, or daffodils grow through them. Be sure to stop by and check out the colours we have available for you.

Indoor Tropical Plants

By , January 6, 2015

January 6th, 2015

Add a Touch of the Tropics to your home!

Most people know that having house plants is good for your home, but how are they good for your home? There are many benefits to having indoor plants including their ability to clean your air. With the right number of house plants you can breathe easier, enjoy improved health, and have a sharper focus.

Over the years NASA has conducted research into the best house plants for cleaning and purifying air. Some of the best include; Areca Palm, Pothos, Peace Lily, Chinese Evergreen, Philodendron, Dracaena, Weeping Fig, and the Rubber Plant. For a list of the best plants for cleaning your air click here. NASA recommends one plant, in a 6 inch (15 cm) or larger pot, per 100 square feet of household. So an 1,000 square foot home should have 10 small house plants.

For tips about growing indoor plants click here.

Hamamelis

By , January 5, 2015

January 5th, 2015

Add colour and fragrance to your winter garden with Witch Hazel!

Witch hazels, also known as Hamamelis, are excellent deciduous shrubs to add to your winter garden. Known best for their colourful flowers and beautiful fragrance no garden would be complete without at least one variety of Witch Hazel. The flowers are beautiful during late winter and early spring from December to February.

The stems of this plant also add structure to your garden. During the summer the green leaves provide an excellent backdrop for other flowering shrubs or excellent shade for your hosta’s or other shade plants.

Witch hazels are hardy to zone 5 (-15 F, or -23 C) and most will grow to 8 to 12 feet high and 6 to 8 feet wide. They are easily grown in average, medium, well-drained soils in full sun to part shade. They flower best in a sunny location. They prefer moist, acidic, organically rich soils and can tolerate heavy clay soils.

As they grow it is important to remove sucker shoots that grow from the root system to prevent them from spreading. For general pruning give them a light pruning in spring after flowering to control shape and size.

The x intermedia hybrids (H. mollis x H. japonica) are large deciduous shrubs which typically grow 12-20′ tall and feature mid to late winter flowers.

You can choose from the following varieties:

  • Hamamelis intermedia ‘Arnold’s Promise’ - bright yellow flowers
  • Hamamelis intermedia ‘Jelena’ – vibrant yellow flower
  • Hamamelis intermedia ‘Sunburst’ – bright yellow

Winter Water Gardens

By , January 1, 2015

Winter Water Garden Care

Winter is a time where very little needs to be done to your water garden. If you have a nice day and you want to get out in the garden the best thing to do is to clean out the debris that has built up in the bottom of your pond.

If temperatures get too cold and the surface of you pond begins to freeze you should melt a hole in the surface of the ice to ensure that any fish in your pond continue to get oxygen.

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